600 HIGHWAYMEN

PART ONE: A PHONE CALL
Feb 4 - 14, 2021

PAST PERFORMANCE Your Phone

Illustrations by: Cass Sachs-Michaels (@okcass)

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Dates: February 4 -14, 2021

“For an hour, I forgot the world around me as I pieced together a blurry picture of a stranger.”  - Margo Vansynghel, Crosscut

On a simple phone call, you and another audience member – nameless strangers to one another – follow a carefully crafted set of directives. Over the course of the journey, a portrait of each other emerges through fleeting moments of exposure and the simple sound of an unseen voice.

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EVERYTHING TO KNOW ABOUT PART ONE

This experience is for you and another audience member. It cannot take place without your presence, don't leave your person hanging! 

  • How does it work?
    24 hours before you will receive a phone number to call at your scheduled event time. Another audience member gets the same information. You will be met by a voice that will guide the two of you.
  • Can I participate in this performance with another member of my household?
    Tickets are for one person only. Members of the same household must have their own ticket and separate devices to join the event. 
  • Where should I call from?
    Call from where you are living! Your space will need to be quiet and your signal strong. 
  • What kind of phone do I need?
    Any phone! Just make sure you are charged up. We discourage Bluetooth headphones and speakerphone. 
  • Can I use headphones to take the call?
    Headphone, ALWAYS! Speakerphone.... probably never. 
  • I’m calling from another country, what should I do?
    Our staff will assist you in obtaining a local number, contact boxoffice@ontheboards.org. In addition, all calls are scheduled in Pacific Standard Time.
  • What else do I need to know?
    Due to the intimate nature of this experience, we cannot accommodate late arrivals.

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CREDITS

A THOUSAND WAYS

by 600 HIGHWAYMEN

written & created by Abigail Browde & Michael Silverstone

Executive Producer: Thomas O. Kriegsmann / ArKtype

Line Producer: Cynthia J. Tong

Dramaturg & Project Design: Andrew Kircher

Part One: A Phone Call Sound Design: Stanley Mathabane

This production was commissioned by The Arts Center at NYU Abu Dhabi, Stanford Live at Stanford University, Festival Theaterformen, and The Public Theater, and was originally commissioned and co-conceived by Temple Contemporary at Temple University. Part One: A Phone Call was developed in partnership with On the Boards production and technical teams. Original support for the production was provided by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, Philadelphia. 

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ABOUT 600 HWM

Since 2009, 600 HIGHWAYMEN (Abigail Browde and Michael Silverstone) have been making live art that, through a variety of radical approaches, illuminates the inherent poignancy of people coming together. The work exists at the intersection of theater, dance, contemporary performance, and civic encounter. Though the processes are varied, each project revolves around the same curiosity: what occurs in the live encounter between people. 

600 HIGHWAYMEN has been called the “the standard-bearers of contemporary theater-making” by Le Monde, and “one of New York’s best nontraditional theater companies” by The New Yorker. They have received commissions from The Public Theater, Temple Contemporary, Salzburg Festival, and Festival Theaterformen. They are recipients of an Obie Award and Switzerland’s ZKB Patronize Prize, and nominees for Austria’s Nestroy Prize, the prestigious Alpert Award, and NYC’s Bessie Award. In 2016, Browde and Silverstone were named artist fellows by the New York Foundation for the Arts. 

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PHOTOS/IMAGES

Promotional photos by Maria Baranova @photo_by_baranova

Illustrations by Cass Sachs-Michaels @okcass )

The term “experimental” tends to signal an ambition to flaunt difficulty and occlude meaning, but 600 Highwaymen’s experiments with theatrical form are distinctly generous. That is the case with “A Thousand Ways,” which takes a simple premise and turns it into magic.