Ambassador Team 1

Presenting the first Ambassador team at On the Boards. Nari BakerZach Huntting and Omar Willey . Get to know them as they dig into OtB's performance world. Find them in the lobby at shows, attend their events, and read what they have to say on the blog throughout the next two months.


Nari Baker is an installation artist and a racial justice advocate.  She was born in Incheon, Korea and immigrated to Vashon Island in 1983. Nari has been engaged in community organizing, politics, and art-making in Asian/Asian American communities, in particular, the Korean transnational adoptee community for the past 10 years. Since 2008, Nari has shown work at the Wing Luke Museum, Jack Straw New Media Gallery, and Edmonds Community College and she has created public installations in Seoul, collaborating and showing work with Korean/Asian American artists from queer, trans and adopted communities. In addition to her artwork, Nari has worked for racial justice by writing grants at the Wing Luke Museum, serving on the Executive Committee for Sahngnoksoo, a Korean/Korean American movement organization, and performing research assistance at ChangeLab, a grassroots political lab. Currently, Nari is the Program Manager at Yoga Behind Bars and a teacher for People of Color Yoga. 

"I am one of approximately 200,000 Korean adoptees sent to North America, Europe and Australia since the Korean War. My experiences growing up as a racial minority and women of color, searching for my birth family, living with a transnational psyche, and reclaiming my history have deeply influenced me as an artist and racial justice advocate. I feel a strong sense of urgency and responsibility to the Korean adoptee community to tell our stories and to link them to larger phenomena such as transnational migration, loss, paradox, imperialism and transformation. I am dedicated to supporting people of color, especially women of color, in the arts and am excited to bridge and build community to create rich cultural experiences and dialogues at OtB for everyone."

Do you like Glitter?
No.

How do you take your coffee?
I drink green tea.

How do you prefer to travel?
By train, window seat, silence.

What album should everyone listen to before they die?
James Brown Live at the Apollo 1963

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
"Inhale" and "Exhale"

 


Zach Huntting is the founder and CEO of Crown Social™, a full-service social media agency specializing in helping companies grow their businesses with social media, combining digital marketing expertise and a knack for building communities and tapping into the viral power of social networking. Prior to Crown Social, Zach was a digital and social strategist at Wunderman, client-side head of marketing, and serial entrepreneur, founding a worldwide event franchise, developing multiple online applications and communities, and a boutique guerrilla marketing agency.

“My personal philosophy toward people, choices, etc., is mostly that there is no wrong or right; however, I feel strongly that good and bad are very black and white when it comes to aesthetics."

Questions:

Do you like Glitter?
Yes, although it's sometimes a little awkward when it follows me around.

How do you take your coffee?
With an inch of whole milk.

How do you prefer to travel?
In my car on the smooth, new highway between LA and Vegas.

What album should everyone listen to before they die?
Frank Ocean, Orange.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?
"Sync" and "ping." 


Omar Willey is currently publisher of The Seattle Star and head of the Puget Sound Cinema Society, hosting screenings of experimental film since 1999. In 1989 he began writing theater reviews for KCMU radio, covering the burgeoning fringe theater scene. Omar was also, along with Sandra Brooks-Dillard, one of only two African-American theater critics in ACTA at the time. Omar comes to performing arts from an interdisciplinary background. Since 1991 he has worked with his group, Lemniscate, producing experimental cinema, stage and radio productions in Seattle. His first love remains avant-garde cinema and his own work explores the boundaries where cinema abuts theater, radio, music, visual art and literature. He has no interest in strict categorizations in art, and he admires and encourages interdisciplinary exploration in other artists. Omar is also interested in the working-class roots of the avant-garde itself, and believes that such art can and should reach back across its traditional middle-class associations to include and express a wider range of concerns.

“My emphasis is more social than aesthetic. I try in all my work, written or otherwise, to examine how art works in our city not as a mere diversion but rather a necessary component of life. I try to bring art to a wider public, not just in the present but also the immediate future, across Balkanized divisions of race, gender, class, ideology. I think most of our cultural "stories about art" are trite. I seek to bring everyone better stories about art, so that it becomes more meaningful to everyone, not just a measured elite.”

Do you like Glitter?
Only when people bomb me with it at Pride, though the Mariah Carey movie has great appeal for masohists.

How do you take your coffee?
I'm a tea drinker.

How do you prefer to travel?
By train, in a sleeping car if affordable.

What album should everyone listen to before they die?
Bill Hicks, Arizona Bay

Which words or phrasese do you most overuse?
Certainly.

On Tuesday, Nov 27th, join us for a global day of giving — and an exciting match pool will make your dollars go farther!

Don't miss this incredible work by the Igbo-Nigerian American artist and 2018 MacArthur Genius Award winner.

Last chance to subscribe with a Pick-6 (for the remaining shows of the 18/19 Season) is Dec 9!