Faustin Linyekula's Festival of Lies Dec 1, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

When the Belgians created the prison they called the Congo, they gave it sort of half a national anthem, using the same melody as the Belgian anthem, but with new words, to the effect that Africans give thanks to King Leopold for bringing civilization. Then Mobutu gave it an anthem and Kabila and others too, one after another the soundtrack for the modern tragedy of Central Africa, which we hear in "Festival of Lies" as part of the score for a reenactment of this tragedy in dance, an art form not often given to such subjects.

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Faustin Linyekula review on Seattlest Nov 30, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

Check out this press review on Seattlest:

Out of Africa: Festival of Lies at On the Boards

"As a soukous band plays and the audience noshes on couscous, red rice, and chicken, all doused with a hearty amount of spicy peanut sauce, a man sways to the music while carrying a fluorescent light to the center of the floor.

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Faustin Linyekula and the Festival of Lies Nov 30, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

I have to be honest. When I first read that Faustin Linyekula was to turn On the Boards into an African  “social club and soukous party," the first image that came to mind was Disney World’s international village. I pictured a faux African nightclub where vacationer’s were encouraged to dance and spend money. Upon arrival I found the stage had indeed been transformed and the audience was encouraged to dance and spend money.

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Faustin Linyekula on KEXP Nov 26, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

Tune in to John Kertzer's African music show The Best Ambiance tonight at 7pm for a live interview with Faustin. You can listen on your radio dial at 90.3 FM or on-line at kexp.org. The show will be available in the KEXP streaming archive for two weeks, so if you missed the live broadcast, you can still listen to it on-line.

Posted by Tania

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Scott/Powell Performance press review Nov 19, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

Here's a press review of the Geography show:

"Get Out This Weekend: Geography at OtB" on Seattlest

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Scott/Powell Performance | Geography Nov 16, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

Welcome to our review blogs for Geography. Read the reviews below, click on the Comments button to read the comments of others and post your own thoughts.

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Scott/Powell | Mapping out geography Nov 16, 2007

by Andy

Scott/Powell Performance’s new work, Geography, is about our global landscape. It is about the human erosion to the global ecology. It is about humanity limiting itself, crowding itself, damaging itself. It is about the perilous obstacles that lie just beyond the fragile confines of the body. It is about drowning Polar Bears.

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Scott/Powell's Unnatural Geographic Nov 16, 2007

by Tania Kupczak

I was eagerly anticipating Geography and I expected it would be easy to write about. Not so: I’m tempted just to say,  “Go see it, as often as you can, ” and leave it at that. But here are a few impressions:

Choreographer Molly Scott has said that Geography was inspired by changes in the environment, especially the way crowding affects us physically and emotionally. I wouldn’t necessarily have guessed this if I hadn’t been told, but the theme has certainly provided a superabundance of choreographic ideas.

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Scott/Powell: Full Frontal Intensity Nov 16, 2007

by Yann

I’m just home for an evening at  “On The Boards, ” where I saw a highly anticipated show, Geography by Scott/Powell Performance.

I was first introduced to the group’s work last Valentine’s Day at  “Ten Tiny Valentine’s Dances, ” where I thought Powell’s well-crafted score perfectly accompanied Scott’s duet. Tonight, I was also anxious for more exposure to Robert Campbell video design, who’s work I first saw at The Henry Art Gallery/ 911 Media’s New Works Laboratory Piece with Yuki Nakamura.

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Scott/Powell Geography Nov 16, 2007

by Brangien

Toward the beginning of Scott/Powell's new work, an ethereal green ensemble jumps into and out of an implied space. Resembling waterbugs, they dance and flit among and around each other, but not exactly *with* each other. It appears to be a microcosm of some kind, a busy colony at work.

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